Analysis of Northeast Governors

Posted by By at 9 January, at 14 : 49 PM Print

Connecticut(D) Dannel Malloy. Elected: Nov. 2010. Salary: $150,000. The salary of Connecticut’s governor ranks eleventh among U.S. governors’ salaries. Governor Highlights: During the 2011 legislative session, Malloy pushed $1.5 billion worth of tax increases to help bridge a budget gap estimated at $3.3 billion. Individual and corporate income tax rates rose, along with inheritance, alcohol, cigarette, and gasoline levies. Additionally, the retail sales tax rate rose from 6% to 6.35%.[1]

New York – (D) Andrew Cuomo. Elected: Nov. 2010. Salary: $179,000. The salary of New York’s governor ranks second among U.S. salaries. Governor highlights: Upon taking office on Jan 1, 2011, Cuomo said that he would cut his pay and that of the lieutenant, governor’s secretary, counsel, director of state operations, counselor, and chief of staff by 5%.[2]

New Jersey(R) Chris Christie. Elected: Nov. 2009. Salary: $175,000. The fourth highest gubernatorial salary in the country. Size of staff: ten. The salary of the governor is legally set by the legislature and may not be raised or lowered effective in the current term. The Governor of New Jersey is considered one of the most powerful governorships in the nation as it is currently the only state-wide elected office in the state. Unlike many other states that have elections for some cabinet-level positions, under the New Jersey State Constitution the governor appoints the entire cabinet, subject to confirmation by the New Jersey State. Governor highlights: Christie received significant criticism for his successful effort to reform state employees’ compensation during the summer of 2011. Ultimately, Christie and his supporters in the state legislature were able to pass a bill eliminating cost of living adjustments for state employees and suspending collective bargaining over health care compensation.[3]

Pennsylvania(R) Tom Corbett. Elected: Nov.2010. Salary $174,914. Pennsylvani’s governor receives the sixth highest salary in the United States. Size of staff: eleven. Governor Highlights: Corbett proposed a 27.3 billion state budget that slashed spending on higher education by $675 million. That included cutting state aid to the eighteen public universities by more than 50%, including Shippensburg, Millersville, Penn State, Pittsburgh, Temple, and Lincoln Universities. Additionally, the cuts included reducing funding to state grants for college students to $381 million, a $7 million reduction. His cut represents the largest single-year reduction in state support to public universities in the nation’s history, according to the American Association of State Colleges and Universities. Pennsylvania’s level of support for higher education could be considered frugal when looking at it from a per capita standpoint.[4]

Delaware – (D) Jack Markell. Elected: Nov. 2008. Salary: $171,000. The salary of Delaware’s governor ranks twenty-third among U.S. governor salaries. The governor’s staff is broken down into three offices. Dover office: 11, Wilmington Office: 16, D.C. office: 2. Governor highlights: Markell’s plan to cut public employee pension and health benefits received overwhelming support from officials within his administration, legislators and even public employee union officials. The proposal, which became law in May 2011, requires new state employees to pay 5% of their salary after the first $6,000 towards their pension, rather than 3%.[5]

Maryland(D) Martin O’Malley. Elected: Nov. 2006. Salary: $150,000. Maryland ranks eleventh among U.S. governors’ salaries.   Government Highlights: On May 19, 2011, O’Malley signed legislation that raised the state sales tax on alcohol from 6 percent to 9 percent. This change was effective July 1, 2011 and is expected to bring in $85 million a year in new revenue. This increase is the first that specifically targeted alcohol since 1972. Minority republicans tried unsuccessfully to stop the legislation, criticizing the tax increase as just another hike, referencing O’Malley’s $1 billion in tax increases in 2007.  Size of staff: 17[6]

Maine(R) Paul Lepage. Elected: Nov. 2010. Salary: $70,000. Maine ranks fiftieth among US governor salaries.  Governor Highlights: In an investigation, Maine Watchdog looked at the contributions to all Maine gubernatorial candidates and found that the largest share of Lepage’s campaign funds came through individual contributions at $650,000. His total contributions for the campaign were $950,000. Size of staff: 19.[7]

Massachusetts(D) Deval Patrick. Elected: Nov. 2006. Salary; $140,535. The salary ranks sixteenth among U.S. governor’s salaries.  Patrick was the first African American governor in Massachusetts history and the second in United States history. He is currently the only African American governor in the United States. Governor Highlights: Patrick is in favor of same sex marriage because of the fundamental principle that “citizens come before their government as equals”. To stem controversy in the socially conservative black religious community, he has emphasized his focus on finding solutions to other Massachusetts issues, such as the murder rate, AIDS, and unemployment. Patrick opposes the death penalty, saying that “the death penalty does not work. It hasn’t worked in actually deterring crime and it won’t work for Massachusetts.” He has a staff of eight in his office, along with numerous other departments.[8]

New Hampshire(D) John Lynch. Elected: Nov. 2004. Salary $113,834. The salary ranks thirty-fifth among U.S. governors’ salaries.  Governor Highlights: In 2010 he was elected to an unprecedented fourth consecutive two-year term. In a poll released on Dec. 20, 2005, Lynch was ranked as the most popular of all Democratic incumbents, with 69% approval versus 21% disapproval. During his third term, Lynch faced a severe budget deficit brought about by increased state spending and revenues that failed to meet budget projections. Lynch estimated that the total deficit would reach $220 million. Lynch proposed fix for the budget hole included targeted cuts at various state agencies, a $.20 per pack tax on cigarettes, anticipated aid from the federal government, and significant borrowing.[9]

Vermont – (D) Peter Shumlin. Elected: Nov.2010. Salary: $142,542. Governor Highlights: As part of a budget recession, the Governor imposed a five percent pay cut for all non-elected Executive branch exempt employees making over $60,000 per annum on Jan 15 , 2009.[10]

Per Diem Rates

Connecticut: Lodging: $104, Meals and exp: $71

New York: Lodging: $104, Meals and exp: $61

New Jersey: Lodging: $119, Meals and exp: $61

Pennsylvania: Lodging: $108 Meals and exp: $51

Delaware: Lodging: $77 Meals and exp: $46

Maryland: Lodging: $116 Meals and exp: $61

Maine: Lodging: $77 Meals and exp: $46

Massachusetts: Lodging: $221 Meals and exp: $71

New Hampshire: Lodging: $81 Meals and exp: $51

Vermont: Lodging: $112 Meals and exp: $ 66[11]

 

Photo by TalkingTree

 

Footnotes    (↵ returns to text)
  1. Sunshinereview.org, ballotpedia.org
  2. Sunshinereview.org, ballotpedia.org,therichest.org
  3. www.state.nj.us, ballotpedia.org, sunshinereview.org
  4. Ballotpedia.org, www.governor.state.pa.us,pastudentsupport.org
  5. Ballotpedia.org, governor.delaware.gov
  6. www.governor.maryland.gov, ballotpedia.org
  7. www.maine.gov, ballotpedia.org
  8. www.mass.gov, ballotpedia.org , www.gsa.gov
  9. Ballotpedia.org, www.gsa.gov
  10. Ballotpedia.org
  11. www.gsa.gov

Comments

Powered by Facebook Comments

This post was written by:
- who has written 3 posts for Rock The Capital
Kenneth L. Mickens II was born and raised in Harrisburg, Pa. He attended Hampton University and graduated with a B.S. in Sport Management, Kenneth also attended East Stroudsburg University of PA where he attained his Master’s degree in Management and Leadership. Kenneth works as an educator in the Harrisburg School District. - Email Ken Mickens

Featured Pennsylvania Issues Political

Related Posts