New England and Northeast State Legislature Analysis: Financial Income Packages

Posted by By at 30 November, at 11 : 32 AM Print

1.)   Connecticut- $28,000 year no per diem is paid; Pension abolished all monies transferred to State Employees Retirement fund. A state legislator must file with the Ethics Commission, within 30 days, a report of the payment or reimbursement of necessary expenses for lodging and/or out of state travel incurred in capacity of public official of state employee, for an article, appearance, or speech, or for participation at an event, unless the payment of reimbursement is provided by the state of Connecticut, the federal government or another state government.[1]

2.)   Delaware- $41,680, $7,334 expense allowance annually. State Legislators must disclose any gift with a value of $250 from any person ]. They may take trips paid for by outside interests and must disclose any travel expenses valued at more than $1,000. If legislators do not receive travel expenses as reimbursements, the trips maybe considered gifts and disclosed accordingly. [2]

3.)   Maine- $ 13,526/ year for first regular session.  $38 a day for housing, or mileage and tolls in lieu of housing (at rate of 0.44/mile up to $38) plus $32/day for meals. Per Diem limits are set by statute. [3]

4.)   Massachusetts- $58,237.15/year. From $10/day- $100/day (V) tied to federal rate and compensation commission. $225 a day for out of state travel. Includes meals and lodging. The Massachusetts State ethics commission has ruled that state legislators may not take anything of substantial value (anything valued at $50 or more) for duties performed in their official capacities or because they are public officials.[4]

5.)   Maryland- $43,500/ year. Lodging $96/day; meals $32/day tied to federal rate and compensation commission. 225 /day for out of state travel. Includes meals and lodging. State Legislators may accept gifts from most outside interests and take trips paid for by most outside interests; no disclosure is required. Limits are placed on gifts from lobbyists and other interests that are regulated by or have financial interests that maybe affected by the legislature. State legislators may accept travel, lodging and food related to their participation on a panel or in connection with a speaking event. [5]

6.)   New York- $79,500/ year. Varies tied to federal state. State legislators may accept gifts from, and take trips paid for by outside interests; they must disclose those valued at $1,000 or more. As of 2011 members of New York State Legislature are paid a per diem of $61 for a half day and $171 full day.  [6]

7.)   New Jersey- $49,000/year. No per diem is paid. State Legislators may accept gifts from outside interests and must disclose those valued at more than $250. They may take trips paid for by outside interests and must disclose travel reimbursements totaling more than $100. [7]

8.)   New Hampshire- $200/a day two year term. No per diem is paid. State Legislators may accept gifts from outside interests and must disclose those valued at more than $50. They may take trips paid for by outside interests and must disclose travel expenses on a report of expense reimbursement form filed  with the New Hampshire’s Ethics committee.[8]

9.)   Vermont- $632.62/ week during session $118 per day for special sessions or interim committee meetings. Federal per diem rate for Montpelier is $101/day for lodging and $61/day for meals for non commuters; commuters receive $61/day for meals plus mileage. State legislators may accept gifts from outside interests and take trips paid for by outside interests; [9]
no disclosure is required.

10.)Pennsylvania- As of 2011, members of the Pa legislature are paid $ 79,613 per year during legislative sessions. Per Diem is tied to the federal rate. The 79, 613 per year that Pa legislators are paid as of 2011 is an increase over the $78,314.66/ a year they were paid during legislative sessions in 2010and $73,613/a year in 2007. Per Diem has increased from $129/day in 2007 to $154 GSA method and $163 high/low method in 2010, but tied to federal rate in 2011.[10]

State Legislature size of staff: Permanent and Session staff

Connecticut- 617

Delaware- 125

Maine- 211

Massachusetts- 903

Maryland- 732

New York- 2,751

New Jersey- 988

New Hampshire- 179

Vermont- 86

Pennsylvania- 2,919

*In 2010 Pennsylvania’s per diem rate was $163 a day high/low method, however in 2011 PA tied the per diem to the federal rate. Additionally Pennsylvania raises the Per Diem to $185 during the summer months of June, July and August.

 


[1] Empirecenter.org, Ballotpedia.org

[2] Ballotpedia.org, NCSL.org

[3] NCSL.org

[4] Ballotpedia.org, NCSL.org

[5] Empirecenter.org, Ballotpedia.org, NCSL.org

[6] Ballotpedia.org, NCSL.org

[7] NCSL.org, AlecWatch.org

[8]  Ballotpedia.org

[9] NCSL.org, Ballotpedia.org

[10]  NCSL.org, Ballotpedia.org

 

Works Cited

“2010 Legislation Compensation Data.” NCSL Home. Legislators & Legislative Staff Data. Web. 6 Sept. 2011. <http://Ncsl.org>.

“Chapter 5- Benefits to Legislative Members.” ALECWATCH. Web. 27 Sept. 2011. <http://alecwatch.org>.

“An Interactive Almanac of State Politics.” 9 July 2011. Web. 13th Sept. 2011. <http://Ballotpedia.org>.

O’Neill, Brian. “Legislative Staff Is a Few Sizes Too Large.” Post-Gazette.com. Pittsburg Post-Gazette, 29 Apr. 2010. Web. 18 Sept. 2011. <http://www.postgazette.com>.

 

 

 

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Kenneth L. Mickens II was born and raised in Harrisburg, Pa. He attended Hampton University and graduated with a B.S. in Sport Management, Kenneth also attended East Stroudsburg University of PA where he attained his Master’s degree in Management and Leadership. Kenneth works as an educator in the Harrisburg School District. - Email Ken Mickens

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