Reaching a Boiling Point in and out of Japan’s troubled Nuclear Plant.

Posted by By at 22 March, at 10 : 22 AM Print

Engineers are back at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant trying to reconnect power to a cooling system and size up the latest growing hot spot. Workers were evacuated on Monday after smoke started billowing from a couple of reactors.

Crews returned to find a fuel pool near boiling point, which if not brought under control will undoubtedly release more radioactive steam and worse yet, potentially lead to an explosion or melting rods that will emit still more radiation.

“We cannot leave this alone and we must take care of it as quickly as possible,” Hidehiko Nishiyama a nuclear safety official told the media.

In the first public butting of heads, the governor of Fukushima balked at a meeting with the president of Tokyo Electric (Tepco), the company which operates the nuclear complex.

“What is most important is for Tepco to end the crisis with maximum effort. So, I rejected the offer,” Governor Yuhei Sato told NHK Television. “Considering the anxiety, anger and exasperation being felt by the people of Fukushima, there is just no way for me to accept their apology.”

Japanese police say the number of people killed in the earthquake and tsunami has topped 9,000 and at 13,500 are still missing. Another roughly 450,000 remain homeless, and the concern over food and water is growing.

Traces of radiation have turned up in vegetables, milk, and now seawater is showing elevated signs of radioactive iodine, and caesium, which has led to the testing of fish. The World Health Organization has strongly suggested that Japan take stricter measures of testing to reassure worn-out citizens.Engineers are back at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plan trying to reconnect power to a cooling system and size up the latest growing hot spot. Workers were evacuated on Monday after smoke started billowing from a pair of reactors.

Crews returned to find a fuel pool near boiling point, which if not brought under control will undoubtedly release more radioactive steam and worse yet, potentially lead to an explosion or melting rods that will emit still more radiation.

“We cannot leave this alone and we must take care of it as quickly as possible,” Hidehiko Nishiyama a nuclear safety official told the media.

In the first public butting of heads, the governor of Fukushima balked at meeting with the president of Tokyo Electric (Tepco), the company which operates the nuclear complex.

“What is most important is for Tepco to end the crisis with maximum effort. So, I rejected the offer,” Governor Yuhei Sato told NHK Television. “Considering the anxiety, anger and exasperation being felt by the people of Fukushima, there is just no way for me to accept their apology.”

Japanese police say the number of people killed in the earthquake and tsunami has topped 9,000 and at 13,500 are still missing. Another roughly 450,000 remain homeless and the concern over food and water is growing.

Traces of radiation have turned up in vegetables, milk, and now seawater is showing elevated signs of radioactive iodine, and caesium, which has led to the testing of fish. The World Health Organization has strongly suggested that Japan take stricter measures of testing to reassure worn-out citizens.

(The Tokyo Electric Power Company has written a letter of apology to the people of Japan, and is now advising or rolling black-outs, you can read the letter by clicking on Rock The Capital.)

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